Facebook Meets Pinterest Meets eCommerce

A few weeks ago, Facebook launched a brand new feature for brand pages called Collections. Collections is the latest feature in Facebook’s ever-broadening plan to mark their stake in the world of eCommerce.

The new feature works essentially like Pinterest, where the brand can curate images of products that its fans can ‘Want‘, ‘Collect‘ or ‘Like‘ a product. It takes the very random nature of Pinterest and refines it down to items that can you know you’ll be able to link back to the retailer and purchase. No more dead links or spam! This could be a major coup for retailers with particularly eye-catching merchandise.

Collections has been made available to some of the top elite e-tailers from the Internet Retailer’s Top 500 list, including: Pottery Barn, Neiman Marcus and Victoria’s Secret. At the moment it looks like the new feature is only being tested on American IPs, but the new feature poses a turning point in social commerce marketing proclaiming that the future of online marketing for eCommerce is the ‘Pinterest’ way.

With the growing number of devoted pinners (and pinners being typically women –the major purchasing power in any household), it’s becoming essential for online retailers to up their products’ cool quotient. Products can’t just be useful; they must look pretty in order to convince the consumer to buy online. In online retail you must catch the consumers eyes because you haven’t got the tactile advantage of a retail space, so your product better appear to be desirable enough to ‘collect’, ‘want’, or ‘like’. Considering the turn social media is taking with an ever-increasing love affair with the image (see Pinterest, Tumblr, etc), online retailers have to up the ante in terms of the images they provide and their quality. Collections seems to be a great way to gauge the desirability of your products in quantifiable numbers.

It’s interesting how Collections is aiming to turn the home catalogue digital in way that is certainly inspired by the Internet’s love affair with Pinterest.  It also seems to be a great way to gauge the desirability of your products in quantifiable numbers. The next thing e-marketers will be counting is ‘wants’ and ‘collects’ vs ‘likes.’

What do you think about Collections? Will it stick? Will you use it?