Marketers Ruin Everything

We’re in an age where everything in digital media is changing so damn fast that the viability “window” with which particular marketing tactics work is actually shrinking exponentially. We’re in the business of acquiring customers and delivering to those customers, the best possible shopping experience through our network of eCommerce sites.

Through consistent testing we are always finding new and interesting methods with which we can acquire a customer. Here’s the problem we now face: once a marketing method works, we scale it up as much as we possibly can. This is a logical thing to do right? Squeeze that lemon for as much juice as possible!! The problem is that customers start to get annoyed with things they are over exposed to. It doesn’t matter of it’s something as simple as daily or weekly deal emails or perhaps more complex search retargeting.

Customers. You know…the ones holding all of the real power in any economy, are getting smarter, faster, just as we as marketers are. Gone are the days where we can toss the same old crap against the wall and hope that it will convert forever. Never has the test-driven marketer been more useful. Never has marketing been so fragile. Develop an amazing tactic today and kiss it good bye a few months later once everyone and their dog is using the same tactic.

If it’s this bad now, what happens in 5 years when we’re going even faster as a digital economy? What happens when everyone’s mobile phone is getting inundated with offers through push notifications?

I’m not at all saying that marketers need to stop saturating marketing tactics. Not at all. I just sat down at my laptop on a Sunday night and had this scary thought that everything our sites are working toward is going to continue to expire exponentially faster than things used to.

If you ever had a doubt towards the importance of velocity of innovation, stop. It’s never been more important. The speed with which we innovate will be the key to our long term success. In 3-5 years we’re going to look back and long for the days when we “used to have to tell retailers they needed to have an online store“.